Online Safety

Introduction

The internet is a fantastic resource for our young people. It is used daily for research, communicating with friends and family, playing interactive games and much more. However, it is vitally important to be aware of what your children see and hear on the Internet, who they meet, and the personal details and photos they share about themselves online. It is easier than ever to access the internet through a wide range of devices and this increases the potential for harm through inappropriate use.

As parents and carers please do talk to your children about how they use the internet and the importance of keeping themselves safe online. I hope the information and links provided below will not only inform you, but also assist you to engage your children in the importance of Online Safety.

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Online Safety Information Evening

Annually we hold an ‘Online Safety Information Evening’ where parents and carers are provided with information and advice. During this presentation, you will learn about how our young people use the internet, our reporting strategies at St Michael's and the filters that you can apply to your home computer. We also hope to answer any questions that you may have.

It is a very worthwhile presentation evening and we have received incredibly positive feedback about it over the past three years.

Online Safety Information Evening 2017 – time and date to be arranged. We hope to see you there!

Top Tips for Parents

‘Online Safety Top Tips of the Term’ are included in the newsletter sent out every half term. However St Michael's top 5 tips are as follows:

1. Produce a ‘Home Agreement’

It’s useful to agree on some ground rules together.
When producing a ‘Home Agreement’ you might want to consider some of the following:

General Online Safety Rules

How much time per night they are allowed on technology/the internet
The age rating of websites they are allowed to visit
Sharing and/or distributing personal details, images and videos
How to treat people online and not post anything they wouldn’t say face-to-face.

Game Console Online Safety Rules

Check the age rating before they play – if the age rating is an 18 these games can include bad language, sexual content etc.

Set their settings so they can only talk to their friends – private chat not game chat.

Negotiate the amount of time they spend playing online games.

 

2. Know who your child is talking to online

It’s important to keep track of who your child’s talking to.
Setting up your own profile on social networking sites is a good idea. You can add your child and monitor their friends, who is commenting on their posts etc.

 

3. Explore online together

Ask your child to show you their favourite things to do online, and show an interest in what they do – just like you would offline.

4. Check they know how to use privacy settings and reporting tools

Check the privacy settings on any online accounts your child has, like Facebook, Instagram and Game consoles etc
Remind them to keep their personal information private.
Talk to your child about what to do if they see content or are contacted by someone that worries or upsets them.  Make sure they know how to use tools to report abuse.

 

5. Use parental controls to filter, restrict, monitor or report content

Internet Service Providers (ISPs), such as Sky, Virgin or BT, provide controls to help you filter or restrict content.
Laptops, smartphones, tablets, game consoles and other devices that connect to the internet, have settings to activate parental controls.
If you are unsure how to change these filters and parental controls, go onto YouTube and type your provider in the search bar, it will come up with some easy to follow videos.

Example: “Sky Parental Controls”

 

Digital Leaders

‘Digital Leaders’ are a group of Year 11 students who are trained by Mrs Rackstraw, Leader in Learning for Online Safety.  They have begun holding regular drop-in sessions at lunchtime, where they offer a wide range of guidance about how to change privacy settings to make profiles more secure, as well as offering advice and support if there is a problem.   All ‘Digital Leaders’ are aware that anything they are told by younger students must not be kept confidential and they are to report anything to Pupil Managers or Mrs Rackstraw.

Reporting Strategies

Throughout the academic year, students are informed of a wide range of ‘Online Safety Reporting Strategies’ during assemblies and Living Education lessons. Just to reiterate to parents and carers they are as follows:

Speak to their form tutor, Pupil Manager, Mr Chadwick or any other member of staff they feel comfortable telling
Go to the “Digital Leader” drop in sessions available at lunchtime.

Report any incident anonymously through the schools “SHARP System.” To access this, you go onto Moodle and it is a button underneath the sign in area. Although this is anonymous, you will need to disclose some clues so Mr Chadwick knows who to talk to and can take action.
If there is an incident that occurs during the holidays we recommend using the CEOP website. If you onto this website, on every page there is a red “Report Abuse” button. If you click this button, you can report an incident to a Child Exploitation and Online Protection officer. This system is monitored continuously. 

Useful Guides

The help guides provided below explain how to change the security and privacy settings on a range of social networking platforms. The instructions are very easy to follow and include images to guide you where to look for the specific icons. 

          

 

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/online-safety

http://www.ceop.police.uk/

http://www.google.co.uk/safetycenter/families/start/

https://www.getsafeonline.org/safeguarding-children/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc/curations/stay-safe

http://www.digizen.org/parents/